Punishment and children

Here are some ideas about how to vary your approach to discipline to best fit your family. Ages 0 to 2 Babies and toddlers are naturally curious.

Punishment and children

Discipline for Young Children - Discipline and Punishment: What is the Difference? ID Punishment and children as Published Valya Telep, Former Extension Specialist, Child Development, Virginia State University Effective discipline helps children learn to control their behavior so that they act according to their ideas of what is right and wrong, not because they fear punishment.

For example, they are honest because they think it is wrong to be dishonest, not because they are afraid of getting caught. The purpose of punishment is to stop a child from doing what you don't want - and using a painful or unpleasant method to stop him.

There are basically four kinds of punishment physical punishment - slapping, spanking, switching, paddling, and using a belt or hair brush. The other two, withholding rewards and giving penalties, can be used either as effective discipline methods or as punishment - depending on how parents administer them.

It is important to look at the way parents administer physical punishments. A swat on the bottom is a mild physical punishment. While it may do no permanent physical harm, it does not help the child develop a conscience. Instead, it teaches him that physical violence is an acceptable way of dealing with problems.

Parents should avoid physical punishment. If they find themselves using it, then something is wrong and their method of discipline is not working. They may as well admit that spanking is more effective in relieving the parents' frustration than in teaching the child self-control.

More effective methods are needed. Harsh physical punishment and verbal abuse can never be justified as ways to discipline children. Parents usually spank when they are angry; a parent may not realize how hard he is striking the child. Verbal abuse hurts the child's self concept.

Why Punishment Doesn't Work Physical punishment usually doesn't work for several reasons. First, it makes the child hate himself and others. Physical punishment makes the child think that there must be something awfully wrong with him to be treated so badly. If children think they are "bad," then they will act "bad.

The child who has been treated harshly has no reason to be good. Or he may be good just to keep from being punished and not learn to be good because he thinks it is the right thing to do.

Children who have been spanked feel that they have paid for their misbehavior and are free to misbehave again.

In other words, spanking frees the child from feelings of remorse which are needed to prevent future misbehavior. Parents who use physical punishment are setting an example of using violence to settle problems or solve conflicts, Children imitate their parents' behavior.

Why Punishment Doesn't Work

When parents use physical punishment, children are more likely to use violent acts to settle their conflicts with others. Another disadvantage of using physical punishment is that parents have to find other discipline methods when the child becomes as tall and as strong as the parent!

Why not start using effective discipline methods when the child is young? Where reward and punishment focus on the child, encouragement and reality discipline target the act. Reward and punishment teaches the child to be "good" as long as we are looking.

When rewards are our chief way of motivating children we run the risk of creating "carrot seekers": If we give a child money for making his bed this week, he'll wonder where his money is next week.

Instead of being self-motivated by a desire to cooperate or help other family members, we have taught the child to look to us for his source of motivation. Helps the child learn self-control Can be used with teenagers Builds the child's self-esteem Sets a good example of effective ways to solve problems.

Teaches the child to deceive parents Won't work with teenagers Teaches the child that violence is an acceptable way to solve problems. Why do Parents Spank? Parents who spank their children rather than using other discipline methods usually say:21 Creative Consequences Disciplining our children well takes wisdom, consistency, and empathy.

It also helps to have a ready sense of humor, a whole lot of love, and a good supply of patience. Whatever your child's age, it's important to be consistent when it comes to discipline. Babies and toddlers are especially unlikely to be able to make any connection between their behavior and physical punishment.

Punishment and children

They will only feel the pain of the hit. Spanking can physically harm children. Rather than teaching kids how to change.

Jan 14,  · Perhaps most surprisingly, corporal punishment in Maine is wildly disproportionate—with black children being eight times as likely to be hurt as white children. 21 Creative Consequences Disciplining our children well takes wisdom, consistency, and empathy. It also helps to have a ready sense of humor, a whole lot of love, and a good supply of patience.

21 Creative Consequences - iMom Argentina[ edit ] Banned inschool corporal punishment was re-legalised in and punishments by physical pain lasted until the s.
Child Discipline 21 Creative Consequences Disciplining our children well takes wisdom, consistency, and empathy. It also helps to have a ready sense of humor, a whole lot of love, and a good supply of patience.

Discipline for Young Children - Discipline and Punishment: What is the Difference? ID. When parents use physical punishment, children are more likely to use violent acts to settle their conflicts with others. Discipline for Young Children - Discipline and Punishment: What is the Difference?

(PDF) Other resources in. Punishment, when meted out fairly, can work to condition people not to repeat misdeeds, and threats of negative repercussions can act. in A Parent’s Guide to Children’s Therapy.

Punishment and children
Disciplining Your Child